Does Urban Development Drive Gentrification?


Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@amutiomi?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Miguel A. Amutio</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/collections/4839828/street-and-urban-life?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a>

Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@amutiomi?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Miguel A. Amutio</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/collections/4839828/street-and-urban-life?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a>

Urban environments are in a constant process of social evolution, political and economic transformation. Attached to the idea of urban renewal is gentrification, a complex phenomenon circumscribing a variety of issues, from the improvement of the built environment and strengthening the local economy to displacement and demographic change. On the one hand, redevelopment means revitalizing neighbourhoods, improving the built environment and infrastructure and boosting the local economy, and on the other hand, gentrification drives up property prices and cost of living, forcing out low-income communities. Is the displacement of local communities a “collateral damage” of urban development? Does redevelopment intrinsically drive gentrification, and can urban environments be revitalized more ethically?

In this Editor’s Talk edition, editors from Argentina, Lebanon, Brasil, Chile, Tanzania share their views on gentrification.

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