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Habitech Architects imitates mountains with sewage works in Taiwan

October 20, 2018 Tom Ravenscroft 0

A trio of dome-shaped structures enclose the Taoyuan Sewage Treatment Project in northern Taiwan, designed by Habitech Architects to resemble mountains, complete with a waterfall and fish pond. Taipei-based Habitech Architects designed the complex to provide offices and an ecological education centre for a sewage plant located north of Taoyuan. The domes unite the different facilities. Constructed from modular steel frames with

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AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

October 19, 2018 Luke Fiederer 0

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

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AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

October 19, 2018 Luke Fiederer 0

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

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AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

October 19, 2018 Luke Fiederer 0

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

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Office Building in Arada / Nelson Resende

October 18, 2018 Rayen Sagredo 0

The building results from the need to create two offices, with possible autonomous use, but allowing an internal connection, considering the possible merging of the two spaces. The construction is located on level ground, at a height of about 1.00 m above the height of the street, and is located in an environment of dispersed buildings with a strong presence of agricultural activity.

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AD Classics: Salk Institute / Louis Kahn

October 17, 2018 Luke Fiederer 0

This article was originally published on August 27, 2017. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

In 1959, Jonas Salk, the man who had discovered the vaccine for polio, approached Louis I. Kahn with a project. The city of San Diego, California had gifted him with a picturesque site in La Jolla along the Pacific coast, where Salk intended to found and build a biological research center. Salk, whose vaccine had already had a profound impact on the prevention of the disease, was adamant that the design for this new facility should explore the implications of the sciences for humanity. He also had a broader, if no less profound, directive for his chosen architect: to “create a facility worthy of a visit by Picasso.” The result was the Salk Institute, a facility lauded for both its functionality and its striking aesthetics – and the manner in which each supports the other.[1,2]

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Tianhong Headquarters Building / CCDI

October 16, 2018 Collin Chen 0

Tianhong’s headquarters project locate in Shenzhen Houhai Central District, connecting with the Financial and Commercial Zone and Nanshan Neiwan Park, about 400 meters away from the subway line 2 Dengliang Station. The east side of the project is the central road and Houhai River, the south side is the substation, the north side is the green land, the northwest side is the planned public park. The building will be built into Tianhong’s headquarters office and the flagship store of Tianhong shopping mall — Jun Shang department store. Nanshan Houhai District has become a mature business circle nearby No. 1 Shenzhen Bay, surrounded by intensive large-scale residential areas and large-scale international headquarters business office area, and provides a 24-hour urban vitality source to this project .

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Starr Atrium / LPA

October 16, 2018 Daniel Tapia 0

The key element of the campus renovation for Edwards Lifesciences, an industry-leading medical device maker, is the LEED Platinum, 22,000-square-foot Starr Atrium, which created a bridge between two existing office buildings and provides a dramatic new entry to the corporate headquarters. The atrium serves as a gathering point, social area and collaborative space for the company’s team. The atrium is also used as a venue for hosting events, including product launches and company meetings, requiring a large flexible space that also reflects the company’s image and values.

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Water Institute headquarters by Perkins+Will sits on Mississippi River

October 16, 2018 Jenna McKnight 0

Global architecture firm Perkins+Will has created a waterfront building for a research organisation in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, that is designed to remain fully functional during floods. Founded in 2011, the Water Institute of the Gulf is a nonprofit organisation that conducts research focused on water systems and coastal communities. Its new headquarters is located on

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Iridescent turquoise bricks front Damien Hirst’s new studio by Stiff + Trevillion

October 16, 2018 Natashah Hitti 0

Iridescent blue bricks and an art-deco-style pediment form the exterior of Damien Hirst’s new headquarters in London’s Soho, designed by architecture studio Stiff + Trevillion. London-based Stiff + Trevillion designed the building as a flexible, creative workspace, as the architects didn’t know at the time who would occupy it. Its aim was to create a

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